What is the Longest Lasting Deck Stain Brand and Sealer is a common question that a residential homeowner may have. Tired of trying all of the stains that are available locally, homeowners are looking towards the Internet for deck stain reviews and help to find a better alternative for the exterior wood. Let us look at what makes a stain or sealer last longer than other brands.

Penetration Into The Wood

This is very simple to explain. The better a wood stain penetrates into the wood, the longer it will last. This is even more important on a horizontal walking deck surface. When a stain soaks into the wood pores it is less likely to peel or wear.

Prepping of the Wood Prior To Stain Application

This is the number one reason why deck stains may fail. The better the wood is prepped the more porous the wood will be. This is then related to penetration. If the wood is prepped and is more porous, then the better the stain penetrates and the longer it will last. Key mistakes that homeowners make is applying a new stain over top a different brand or not prepping new wood with a wood cleaner and wood brightener.

Transparency

In general, the more pigment or darker color a stain has, the longer it will take to fade away. We prefer semi-transparent stains as they offer UV protection and still show the natural grain of the wood.

Now the most important question, which stain brand lasts the longest? Hard to say since stains perform differently based on where you live and your overall weather exposure. Feel free to ask below in our comment section about which deck stain or sealer would last the longest for your deck.

Be sure to include:

  • State you live in
  • Previous coatings that were used and why they failed
  • Any other information that may be useful
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    The Sealer Store · 10/02/2017
    Elizabeth Seitz2752:
    What is best for direct exposure new treated lumber deck deck rails.

    See this about new wood: https://www.opwdecks.com/when-to-stain-a-new-deck.htm
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    Elizabeth Seitz2752 · 10/02/2017
    What is best for direct exposure new treated lumber deck deck rails.
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    The Sealer Store · 09/11/2017
    Nancy Brashears:
    Best sander to use?
    Do I always need a sealer over the stain?
    How long should I expect park bench stain last?
    Want to save money if possible.
    I am lazy no very old and cheap no poor.
    Thanks

    -Belt sander
    -You never apply a sealer over a deck stain.
    -2 to 3 years.
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    The Sealer Store · 09/11/2017
    Corlia:
    We have a pine deck and have used Thompson's water seal in the past. It has worked okay, but we would like a longer lasting product. We have summer temps in the upper 90s with rain and humidity. Winters are variable, with rain, snow, and ice. The lowest temps have been about 10 below zero. Our most frustrating challenges include whiskey fungus from nearby distilleries and carpenter bees. We would like something that is thick enough to deter the bees and potentially impede the fungus growth. We would also like to allow some wood grain to show through if possible. However, preserving the wood for the longest period possible is our highest priority. Any ideas you have would be appreciated.

    Try Armstrong Clark in a semi-solid color:
    https://www.opwdecks.com/armstrong-clark-stain.htm
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    Corlia · 09/10/2017
    We have a pine deck and have used Thompson's water seal in the past. It has worked okay, but we would like a longer lasting product. We have summer temps in the upper 90s with rain and humidity. Winters are variable, with rain, snow, and ice. The lowest temps have been about 10 below zero. Our most frustrating challenges include whiskey fungus from nearby distilleries and carpenter bees. We would like something that is thick enough to deter the bees and potentially impede the fungus growth. We would also like to allow some wood grain to show through if possible. However, preserving the wood for the longest period possible is our highest priority. Any ideas you have would be appreciated.
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    Nancy Brashears · 09/10/2017
    Best sander to use?
    Do I always need a sealer over the stain?
    How long should I expect park bench stain last?
    Want to save money if possible.
    I am lazy no very old and cheap no poor.
    Thanks
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    The Sealer Store · 09/09/2017
    Barry77:
    We have a deck fully exposed to sun, rain, hail and snow. Temps reach to upper 90s in summer and during monsoon, we get a lot of heavy rain. During the winter, there is a lot of snow on the deck. We do not live here fulltime so snow will sit on deck for long periods of time. We don't know what was previously used on deck so we used a stripping agent, sanded areas and then applied a tinted Thompsons Water Seal that was supposed to last 3-5 yrs. It loooked great and repelled water but within 3 months it started peeling up. Went thru the process again trying to make sure there was good coverage on the wood. Again, looked great and repelled water but started peeling up about 3 months later. Tinted Thompsons Water Seal is obviously not working. Very frustrated at this point! It's a lot of of work to only last 3 months. What can we use that will last? We love the look of stained wood rather than paint, if possible. Please advise.

    Remove all the Thompsons first and try the Armstrong Clark. It will not peel.
    https://www.opwdecks.com/armstrong-clark-stain.htm
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    Barry77 · 09/09/2017
    We have a deck fully exposed to sun, rain, hail and snow. Temps reach to upper 90s in summer and during monsoon, we get a lot of heavy rain. During the winter, there is a lot of snow on the deck. We do not live here fulltime so snow will sit on deck for long periods of time. We don't know what was previously used on deck so we used a stripping agent, sanded areas and then applied a tinted Thompsons Water Seal that was supposed to last 3-5 yrs. It loooked great and repelled water but within 3 months it started peeling up. Went thru the process again trying to make sure there was good coverage on the wood. Again, looked great and repelled water but started peeling up about 3 months later. Tinted Thompsons Water Seal is obviously not working. Very frustrated at this point! It's a lot of of work to only last 3 months. What can we use that will last? We love the look of stained wood rather than paint, if possible. Please advise.
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    The Sealer Store · 08/31/2017
    Angie C:
    Have a new south facing cedar deck being built. I live in fort collins colorado. Deck will be partly covered. Open part gets about 6 hrs of direct sunlight a day. We also get quite a bit of wet snow in winters. Best prep, stain and when to apply? My contractor says apply right away but that is not what I am seeing as recommended.

    Can't do it right away. See this article for tips: https://www.opwdecks.com/when-to-stain-a-new-deck.htm
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    Angie C · 08/31/2017
    Have a new south facing cedar deck being built. I live in fort collins colorado. Deck will be partly covered. Open part gets about 6 hrs of direct sunlight a day. We also get quite a bit of wet snow in winters. Best prep, stain and when to apply? My contractor says apply right away but that is not what I am seeing as recommended.
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    The Sealer Store · 08/22/2017
    Dorothy:
    Northern MN, Duluth. Cold harsh winters snow and ice. Partial sun, new pressure treated pine

    See this for tips on how to prep and stain new wood: https://www.opwdecks.com/when-to-stain-a-new-deck.htm
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    Dorothy · 08/21/2017
    Long cold winters heavy snow northern mn pressure treated pine new
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    Dorothy · 08/21/2017
    Northern MN, Duluth. Cold harsh winters snow and ice. Partial sun, new pressure treated pine
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    The Sealer Store · 08/13/2017
    Margaret:
    We have very hot summers (many days of triple digit and near triple digit temperatures), and very wet winters. This is for a footbridge over a seasonal creek. The bridge is made of red cedar, with pressure treated wood support beams. We just had it built, but plan to wait a year for it to weather before staining it. Thank you!

    Try the TWP 100 Series:
    https://www.opwdecks.com/twpwoodsealers.htm
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    Margaret · 08/12/2017
    We have very hot summers (many days of triple digit and near triple digit temperatures), and very wet winters. This is for a footbridge over a seasonal creek. The bridge is made of red cedar, with pressure treated wood support beams. We just had it built, but plan to wait a year for it to weather before staining it. Thank you!
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    The Sealer Store · 08/11/2017
    dbne:
    Omaha, Nebraska. New cedar deck/pergola which has weathered 12 months. Southern exposure. Looking for info on which cleaner and brightener to use, and which semi-transparent stain. We want the best/longest protection possible while still being able to see some of the wood grain.

    Prep with this:
    https://www.opwdecks.com/best-selling-cleaner.htm

    Stain with Armstrong Clark:
    https://www.opwdecks.com/armstrong-clark-stain.htm
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    dbne · 08/11/2017
    Omaha, Nebraska. New cedar deck/pergola which has weathered 12 months. Southern exposure. Looking for info on which cleaner and brightener to use, and which semi-transparent stain. We want the best/longest protection possible while still being able to see some of the wood grain.
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    The Sealer Store · 08/10/2017
    britta:
    I have a brand new redwood deck and was told by my contractor to seal it with Cabot's Australian Timber Oil, but the company says I must wait 2 months for wood to dry out. Another site said not to wait more than a week or two to seal a new redwood deck to protect it. Help!

    Yes, you should wait:
    https://www.opwdecks.com/when-to-stain-a-new-deck.htm
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    The Sealer Store · 08/10/2017
    Steve Kocourek:
    I have a rebuilt deck, the railings, stairs and deck surface were destroyed due to lack of sealing and the strong sun we have in tennessee. I am looking for a semi-transparent brown/red stain / sealer than will cover some mold strains, hold up the direct sun (80% of day exposure to.sun) and potentially be useful for refreshing my picket fence.

    See this about new wood: https://www.opwdecks.com/when-to-stain-a-new-deck.htm
  • We will reply to your comment shortly
    Steve Kocourek · 08/09/2017
    I have a rebuilt deck, the railings, stairs and deck surface were destroyed due to lack of sealing and the strong sun we have in tennessee. I am looking for a semi-transparent brown/red stain / sealer than will cover some mold strains, hold up the direct sun (80% of day exposure to.sun) and potentially be useful for refreshing my picket fence.